Tourist Attractions in Piet Retief, Grass & Wetlands, Mpumalanga

Tourist Attractions near Piet Retief, Mpumalanga, South Africa
Piet Retief Dutch Reformed Church

courtesy of pasopvirpot Panomario
Jacarandas en Piet Retief (primavera)

courtesy of mariogg Panomario
Piet Retief-Sunset

courtesy of ramonaldo Panomario

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Road Map of Piet Retief
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The small town of Piet Retief is situated on the Assegai River in the extreme South East of Mpumalanga. Weary travelers heading from Gauteng to the coast would be well-advised to rest in one of the many well-maintained guesthouses in the area. Piet Retief is the last major town before reaching the Elephant Coast, so it is also a good place to stock up on last minute items.

It is situated in the center of huge timber plantations and was originally established in 1883 on the farms Osloop and Geluk. The town gets its name from the voortrekker Piet Retief who was killed by the Zulu King Dingane in 1838, and whose descendants were the founders of the original village. Settlers of many nationalities, many of them Scots and Germans, found Piet Retief to be a charming village and an attractive farming area. The surrounding area abounded with indigenous hardwoods, including yellowwood and other valuable timbers, and these were initially cut up into planks and sent to the Transvaal Republic.

There was large scale planting of wattle between 1900 and 1910, and after the advent of the railways in 1911, forestry and woodworking soon became important industries in Piet Retief, and timber was transported from the area to the whole of South Africa and exported overseas. Piet Retief has developed into an important center for the timber industry with over 75000 ha of forest. Scottish and German influence can still be seen in the area, and German is still the first language of many families.

Things To Do in Piet Retief
Piet Retief Attractions
Piet Retief Golf Course: less than 5 km
Intombe Drift Battlefield: 50 km


Holme Lea Manor in Piet Retief, Mpumalanga
In our homely manor we offer you the following; Personal service and attention. 13 Tastefully furnished bedrooms. Bedroom en-suite. Generous English breakfasts or health breakfasts. Television with M-Net in each room and safe secure parking.
DeJa-Vu Lodge & Wedding Venue in Piet Retief, Mpumalanga
Our rooms are uniquely designed with the greatest amount of attention being paid to details. Each room guarantees a peaceful nights rest, ensuring that you are ready for whatever the following day might have in store.
African Flair Country Lodge in Piet Retief, Mpumalanga
We have four beautiful thatched chalets, each with their own secure under-roof parking, that are safe and very private. Each chalet has a large room with a sitting area and a dining area
Waterside Lodge in Piet Retief, Mpumalanga
This is the ideal place for any tourist or businessman who either want to relax or enjoy a good night's sleep in one of our 28 en-suite rooms/chalets. Our rooms offer a view over the dam, satellite television, braai facilities, laundry facilities...
Emahlathini Guest Farm in Piet Retief, Mpumalanga
Emahlathini Guestfarm is the ideal place to stay! Whether for work or pleasure. Emahlathini farm is 18 km out of Piet Retief towards the Swaziland border. It's tranquil and peaceful environment makes it the ideal stop-over for the tired rep on the

The small town of Piet Retief is situated on the Assegai River in the extreme South East of Mpumalanga. Weary travelers heading from Gauteng to the coast would be well-advised to rest in one of the many well-maintained guesthouses in the area. Piet Retief is the last major town before reaching the Elephant Coast, so it is also a good place to stock up on last minute items.

It is situated in the center of huge timber plantations and was originally established in 1883 on the farms Osloop and Geluk. The town gets its name from the voortrekker Piet Retief who was killed by the Zulu King Dingane in 1838, and whose descendants were the founders of the original village. Settlers of many nationalities, many of them Scots and Germans, found Piet Retief to be a charming village and an attractive farming area. The surrounding area abounded with indigenous hardwoods, including yellowwood and other valuable timbers, and these were initially cut up into planks and sent to the Transvaal Republic.

There was large scale planting of wattle between 1900 and 1910, and after the advent of the railways in 1911, forestry and woodworking soon became important industries in Piet Retief, and timber was transported from the area to the whole of South Africa and exported overseas. Piet Retief has developed into an important center for the timber industry with over 75000 ha of forest. Scottish and German influence can still be seen in the area, and German is still the first language of many families.